The PhD and Postdoc positions under LIVEFOR project are funded by DANIDA and implemented at Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) in collaboration with Copenhagen University (UC) and the Mwalimu Nyerere Memorial Academy (MNMA).  

 

 

IMG 20210730 WA0022Benezet Mugisha Rwelengera is a PhD student at SUA and UC. His study is titled ‘Interrogating the Production and Circulation of Pastoralism-Forestry Knowledge in Tanzania’.  Long lasting debates exist on the adverse effects of pastoral inclusion in forests across the world and in Tanzania in particular. Literature is rife with diverse and conflicting positions regarding grazing in forests. Narratives and discourses generally advance stereotypes and beliefs that pastoralism is backward and unfriendly to conservation. These narratives are equally advanced by scientific forestry, the media and education - further reinforce the need to exclude pastoralists from grazing in forests. This study specifically seeks to examine the scientific evidence basis for the pastoralism-forestry incompatibility logic; analyse the media framing of pastoralist-forest relations; and examine the role of education in advancing the pastoralism-forestry incompatibility logic.

 

 

IMG 20210730 WA0042Edith Benedict Muhina is a PhD student at the SUA and the UC. Her research is entitled ‘Institutionalising Pastoralism in Community Based Forest Management in Tanzania’. In Tanzania, pastoralists and agropastoralists (PAPs) have been leaving their traditional grazing areas for many reasons including to create/expand state conservation space and in search of greener pastures.  Consequently, some PAPs have settled in and use village land forest reserves (VLFRs) for pastures. VLFRs as a form of decentralised forest management and under agreed upon institutional arrangements have the potential to include PAPs as co-users. However, VLFRs fall under the jurisdiction of the political and administrative village governments, hence the chances of increasing conflicts between PAPs and communities; yet excluding PAPs as newcomers. Therefore, the fact that PAPs can gain or lose access to the VLFRs requires more scrutiny. Specifically, the research aims to: examine the history of CBFM and territorial processes through which PAPs access VLFRs; examine institutional process of including PAPs in VLFRs; analyse the distribution of costs and benefits of including PAPs VLFR; and assess gender implications of including PAPs in VLFRs.

 

IMG 20210730 WA0030Raymond Emmanuel Okick is a PhD student at SUA and UC. His study is titled: ‘Impacts of Pastoralists and Agro-Pastoralists Integration on Forests’ Productivity and Economic Value in Tanzania’. Pastoralism and Agro-pastoralism (PAPs) are traditional livestock production systems commonly practiced across the world. Recently in Tanzania, PAPs have been migrating to other regions that had no pastoral systems before. Consequently, such movements have resulted in conflicts as such calling for scrutiny. However, grazing is associated with economic and productivity function of forest ecosystems. Therefore, the study aims to understand how grazing affect the growth and diversity of vegetation;  how grazing affect the biomass production of forests;  what are the human-derived ecosystem services generated from the forest and their economic values;  and what is likely to be the optimum grazing intensity with respect to forest and livestock production.

The PhD and Postdoc positions under LIVEFOR project are funded by DANIDA and implemented at Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) in collaboration with Copenhagen University (UC) and the Mwalimu Nyerere Memorial Academy (MNMA).  

 

 

IMG 20210730 WA0022Benezet Mugisha Rwelengera is a PhD student at SUA and UC. His study is titled ‘Interrogating the Production and Circulation of Pastoralism-Forestry Knowledge in Tanzania’.  Long lasting debates exist on the adverse effects of pastoral inclusion in forests across the world and in Tanzania in particular. Literature is rife with diverse and conflicting positions regarding grazing in forests. Narratives and discourses generally advance stereotypes and beliefs that pastoralism is backward and unfriendly to conservation. These narratives are equally advanced by scientific forestry, the media and education - further reinforce the need to exclude pastoralists from grazing in forests. This study specifically seeks to examine the scientific evidence basis for the pastoralism-forestry incompatibility logic; analyse the media framing of pastoralist-forest relations; and examine the role of education in advancing the pastoralism-forestry incompatibility logic.

 

 

IMG 20210730 WA0042Edith Benedict Muhina is a PhD student at the SUA and the UC. Her research is entitled ‘Institutionalising Pastoralism in Community Based Forest Management in Tanzania’. In Tanzania, pastoralists and agropastoralists (PAPs) have been leaving their traditional grazing areas for many reasons including to create/expand state conservation space and in search of greener pastures.  Consequently, some PAPs have settled in and use village land forest reserves (VLFRs) for pastures. VLFRs as a form of decentralised forest management and under agreed upon institutional arrangements have the potential to include PAPs as co-users. However, VLFRs fall under the jurisdiction of the political and administrative village governments, hence the chances of increasing conflicts between PAPs and communities; yet excluding PAPs as newcomers. Therefore, the fact that PAPs can gain or lose access to the VLFRs requires more scrutiny. Specifically, the research aims to: examine the history of CBFM and territorial processes through which PAPs access VLFRs; examine institutional process of including PAPs in VLFRs; analyse the distribution of costs and benefits of including PAPs VLFR; and assess gender implications of including PAPs in VLFRs.

 

IMG 20210730 WA0030Raymond Emmanuel Okick is a PhD student at SUA and UC. His study is titled: ‘Impacts of Pastoralists and Agro-Pastoralists Integration on Forests’ Productivity and Economic Value in Tanzania’. Pastoralism and Agro-pastoralism (PAPs) are traditional livestock production systems commonly practiced across the world. Recently in Tanzania, PAPs have been migrating to other regions that had no pastoral systems before. Consequently, such movements have resulted in conflicts as such calling for scrutiny. However, grazing is associated with economic and productivity function of forest ecosystems. Therefore, the study aims to understand how grazing affect the growth and diversity of vegetation;  how grazing affect the biomass production of forests;  what are the human-derived ecosystem services generated from the forest and their economic values;  and what is likely to be the optimum grazing intensity with respect to forest and livestock production.